The Gold Leaf Series

The John Kasinger Gold Leaf Series is special in many ways.

These tree photographs are all from my infrared images on film. Infrared film is complicated and unpredictable.

Photographing trees with this film captures the magic quality of nature that you don't see with the naked eye. The infrared film is scanned to make a digital file.

They are all handmade. This process involves printing each image on special transparent vellum and then hand gold leafing every piece so no two are exactly alike. This is a time taking process with many steps.

These pieces are hand numbered and signed. They are single matted and archival gallery framed and ready to hang on your wall. Find the right spot and the gold is radiant.

It has taken years to develop this process. The Gold Leaf Series is my favorite photographic process. It is archival and I hope you enjoy it as much as I do.

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Gold   Leaf   Tree   #270
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Gold   Leaf   Tree   #271
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Gold   Leaf   Tree   #277
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Gold   Leaf   Tree   #273
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Gold   Leaf   Tree   #280
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Gold   Leaf   Tree   #276
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Gold   Leaf   Tree   #272
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Gold   Leaf   Tree   #274
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Gold   Leaf   Tree   #278
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Gold   Leaf   Tree   #275

The tree photographs in this gold leafed series are all infrared black and white film images. Black and white infrared film photography has been a popular photographic medium for many years.
 
Manufacturers of black and white infrared have come and gone over the last 25 years. Kodak, MACO. Efke and now Rollei have been the major players. I have used them all and loved them all. Aside from Kodak they are all very similar. Kodak was the most interesting of the lot. It was grainy and when overexposed it would “bloom”.
 
This “bloom” I refer to is where when overexposed whites or highlights would grow and spill over into the nearest darker tones. This gave an ethereal glowing look to the image. Sometimes this was good and sometimes not.
 
The images in this gold leaf series were all taken with MACO infrared film some time ago. That film is no longer made. It is like the Rollei 400 infrared that I use today.
 
Film infrared produces a different image than digital infrared. This can be good or bad. I do both film and digital infrared but that is a discussion for another day.
 
These photographs were all made with MACO infrared film. I used a B+W 092 Infrared filter on a Hasselblad 500 cm with an 80mm lens. ISO of this film and filter combination is 6 when processed in Acufine Diluted 1:5.
 
Which Filter to use is always a debate. I use both Hoya R72 and B+W 092. They both produce the same result. Either one of those two will do fine.
 
About the developer. Acufine is my favorite. This developer is meant to be used, saved and replenished. I do not use it that way. I use it as a “one shot developer”. That is to say that I use it once and throw it away.